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GenToGenPodcast - Episode 9 - DJ Nova Jade* - Friday Night Live at the John Anson Ford Amphitheatre Mix (http://gentogen.podomatic.com)
Explicit
July 26, 2011 02:40 PM PDT
itunes pic

On July 8, 2011, Sinai Temple's Friday Night Live service took to the John Anson Ford in Hollywood, CA for a once-in-a-lifetime Shabbos event. Here's the mix before Shabbat that I spun in the Birthright Israel NEXT Wine Garden. Special thanks to everyone who submitted music and/or helped promote some of the tunes selected (JDub), and especially to Craig N' CO, ATID, IKAR, Beit T'Shuvah, Birthright Israel NEXT LA, Moishe House and all the volunteer, congregants and friends who made this a magical event! This download is for promo only - not for resale (or sale for that matter!) Thanks!

>>>> Tracks: 1 - Neshama Carlebach - Yehi Shalom Intro | 2 - Zack Lodmer - Lo Yisa Goy  | 3 - Mikey Pauker - Eli | 4 - King Django - Seventh Day | 5 - Tomer Yosef - Don't Fly | 6 - *Sagol 59 feat Shaanan Street (Hadag Nachash), Rebel Sun - Jerusalem (Contains mild explicit language) | 7 - Beit T'Shuvah - Elohai Neshama | 8 - Craig Taubman - Alenynu | 9 - Oren Barzilay - God's Creation | 10 - Oi Va Voi - Brothers  | 11 - Oi Va Voi - Ladino Song | 12 - Craig Taubman - Tzur Mishelo | 13 - Zack Lodmer - Shalom Aleichem | 14 - The Sway Machinery - Anim Zemiros  | 15 - Shlomo Carlebach & Neshama Carlebach - B'shaim Hashem/The Angel Song | 16 - IKAR - L'kha Dodi ((http://ikar-la.org/)) | 17 - Neshama Carlebach - Yehi Shalom Message Reprise | 18 - IKAR - Rivers Of Babylon (((http://ikar-la.org/))

 

To Arts,

Tera "Nova Jade* Greene
Creative Director + Visionary, GenToGen

Are you or do you know of any Los-Angeles Based Next Gen (21-33) Jewish Artists looking for more exposure and want to be a part of a dynamic Artist community? Well, GenToGen wants your tunes, art, poetry, et al! Please submit to: GenToGenLA@Gmail.com with the subject 'Artist Submission'. Submissions will be received on a rolling bases.  All submissions welcome regardless of generation, discipline or denomination.

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Playlist Converter: http://calardoandgrant.com/tools/m3upc/

More great mix-tapes: http://www.mixcrate.com/djnovajade

Podcast: http://djnovajade.podomatic.com

Booking: DJNovaJade@Gmail.Com | (323) 309-4389 | Contact: Tera Greene*

GenToGenPodcast - Episode 8 - Mikey Pauker [Jewish/Folk Music Artist] (Read full Interview at http://gentogen.podomatic.com)
July 11, 2011 12:22 PM PDT
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Main Photo: Mikey Pauker, Album Cover Art ((Photography - Natalie Zigdon))

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"Thom Yorke from RadioHead."

Mikey Pauker on whom he'd want to meet to pick their brain over tea or coffee, GenToGen Podcast Interview, July 2011

http://gentogen.podomatic.com

Read the Interview Now

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I met Mr. Pauker at an event called SEDER, a recurring Jewish cultural event with a goal of hosting "several community meals a year [with] all funds raised in exchange for food becoming a micro-grant.  During the meal, the micro-grant is awarded to an artist with a Jewish art and culture project that will reach out to the LA Community."  

Put on by the Jewish Artists Initiative, under the guidance of Program Director, Anne Hromadka, the SEDER event I attend for $18 was a delight, from the food to the artists who performed for us... and Mikey Pauker was part of the treats of the evening!

I recently DJ'd a pre-Shabbos event at the Ford Theatre in Hollywood, CA, wherein I included music from Mikey Pauker and his band, The JoyMachine, so stay tuned in a couple of weeks for that mix, and if you're in Los Angeles, catch a show (next two show dates listed below).

For now, let's get right into it, shall we?


WEB:   mikeypauker.com

VIDEOS: Yaish Lanu Aish Music Video | Wicker Man Music Video

 

UPCOMING SHOW DATES:

 07/11/11 Mikey Paker & The JoyMachine in Laguna Beach SawDust Festival

Time: 11:30am.

Admission: $7.75.

Age restrictions: All Ages. Address: 935 Laguna Canyon Rd.. Buy tickets

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07/17/11 Mikey Paker & The JoyMachine in Laguna Beach SawDust Festival

Time: 5:00pm.

Admission: $7.75. Age restrictions: All Ages. Address: 935 Laguna Canyon Rd.. Buy tickets

To Arts,

Tera "Nova Jade* Greene
Creative Director + Visionary, GenToGen

Are you or do you know of any Los-Angeles Based Next Gen (21-33) Jewish Artists looking for more exposure and want to be a part of a dynamic Artist community? Well, GenToGen wants your tunes, art, poetry, et al! Please submit to: GenToGenLA@Gmail.com with the subject 'Artist Submission'. Submissions will be received on a rolling bases.  All submissions welcome regardless of generation, discipline or denomination.

*

Mikey Pauker Band

Mikey Pauker + The JoyMachine


Six dynamic adjectives about Mikey Pauker:

Transformative, Yogi, Energetic, Musical, Loving, Goofy.

Mikey's favorite color:

Purple.

What form of Art do you do? (Ie. How do you Make Beautiful the world)

I write and perform Tribal, spiritual, folk, world, love inspired vibrations. 

Is this a profession or hobby?

This is my life.  My everything.  I enjoy every moment of it.  Yes it has been challenging AND inspiring.  Why make it a hobby if you live for it?  If you wake up thinking about sharing your art then it's your responsibility to share it.

And when did you start on the path of your Art?

I started putting out demos in high school.  However, I have been taking my music career seriously for only the past two years.  I made a major transformation when I started putting out spiritual folk music.

I see! Going with that theme of transformation, describe a moment in time where Art truly healed you.

I recently saw  a friend's movie that he just released at the film festivals this year.  This year his film was featured at the South By Southwest Film festival.  He co-wrote and directed, "Bag Of Hammers," starring Jason Ritter and Rebecca Hall. It's been a while since I have cried, at the end of a movie.  Yes.. I cried.. long and hard.  It was amazing to let it out.  Amen.

Beautiful. What other forms of Art inspire you?

Film and Fashion inspire me.  I don't want watch much TV, but when I do have down time, it's always nice to watch a new film.  I love becoming lost in the plot of the story, and you can't beat surround sound in the movie theatre.  I enjoy going for a seasonal shopping spree, and checking out the new styles for the year.  Lately, I have been wearing indian scarves, bright colors, and prayer beads.  My fashion choice is inspired by my spirituality and way of life.

You definitely have a great fashion sense. I picked up on it immediately when I saw you at the SEDER event. I think, outside of hearing you start to sing, that was what initially drew me to you.  On that note, who are your influences?

Sublime, Bob Marley.

Nice choices. OK, so GenToGen is about helping to Support the Arts and the Artists who create them while building a dynamic Jewish community that is trans-denominational, pluralistic and trans-disciplinary. Are you Jewish and if so, how do you approach your Jewishness (are you secular, traditional, cultural, young leadership, conservative)?

Denominations act as limits, why do we have do define our Judaism?  

I grew up reform, but didn't ever connect with my clergy.  I was raised in a progressive household that was mostly secular.  My parents are independent thinkers, and I'm not sure what they would define themselves at either.  I did have a Bar-Mitzvah, Confirmation, went to some temple youth group events, and county wide youth group events; and post high school, I went to San Francisco State University and was involved in Hillel where I led some friday night services as the Koret Intern.  I went on birthright and then back again for a quick 3 week study at Aish Ha Hotrah in the old city in Jerusalem.  It was transformational, and an incredible learning experience.  However, I did't truly connect with davening without music.  I also didn't agree with the political jib-jab... i'm an independent thinker and humanitarian.  We need to stop blaming and each other and RETURN on the road to peace.

Post Aish, I took a break from Judaism, because I still didn't feel a connection with any community and prayer ritual.  I found a job at a Jewish summer camp in Santa Rosa, called Camp Newman, and fell in love with Judaism for the first time.  I was hired as a song leader who was worked with a team of talented Jewish music educators, leading daily song sessions and services.  For the first time I found prayer.  I found my community.  It was in the music the entire time.

I connect with my spirituality through song, mantra, yoga and instrumentation.  We are all musical beings, why not elevate our existence to another level on a daily basis, especially on Shabbat?  Well I'm sure you can come up with an argument about Halacha this.. Halachah that.. and blah blah blah blah.. and that's why I never connected.  King David used instrumentation during prayer, so can we.  We should pray in whatever way we hope to.  This is our time.

So, how does your Jewish background influence your art?

By growing up in summer camp, and being around musical prayer services, the melodies and method of prayer has truly influenced my art.  I grew up hearing [and] singing Debbie Friedman, Jeff Klepper, and Julie Silver melodies of liturgical blessings at Temple Beth El in Aliso Viejo, California.  Even though I didn't connect with these melodies until I returned to camp as a song leader in 2009, they had a deep impact on the way that I write my melodies.

Mikey Pauker
Mikey Pauker

How important it is to you to create Art that provokes or pushes the envelope?  Do you create such a form of Art?

All art should push the envelope and mine included.  I play Jewish music in secular settings including clubs and festivals.  Why hide what you do based on location?

Where do you currently live?

I was living In Silverlake... east Los Angeles.  Now I am in a small pink cabin at Camp Alonim at the Brandeis-Bardin Institute.

Mikey Pauker

Mikey Pauker, Album Cover

Curious to hear! I love Brandeis-Bardin - such a beautiful and magical place.  So, let's dive even more deeply: What are your biggest concerns for the world and how does Art help repair those concerns?

1)  Lack of  Global Unity

2)  Intolerance

3)  Greed

4)  Genocide

5)  Anti-semestism

6)  Lack of education

My art connects the secular to the spiritual world.  My music inspires and educates communities on all of these issues. 

What age group are you in? The Golden Age (45+), the In-Between Gen (33-45), Next Gen (21-32), Youth    

Mid twenties. 

And how does your Art connect the different generations, Mikey?

My music is liturgically inspired... liturgy is timeless.

Why do you feel it is important to stay connected to all generations?

All generations have a voice.  We need to listen to everyone.

So, what's your legacy?

Selflessness.

Where do you see yourself in 5 years?

World tour.

And finally, what are some of your BIGGEST, JUICIEST GOALS and how will your form of Art help you get there?

I want to tour with the biggest artists in the world, and to make a living off of educating the world through my music.

Mikey, the world is waiting!  Go out and Jump in the fields, sing higher and higher and keep inspiring!

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Mikey Pauker is a Jewish/Folk music artist hailing out of Los Angeles, California.  Mikey is recognized as an engaging musician who is stretching the boundaries of contemporary Jewish music with his soulful, globally influenced sound.  Mikey draws inspiration from traditional Jewish liturgy, his own spiritual journey, and from artists such as Damien Rice, Jack Johnson, Ray Lamontagne, Dan Nichols, Julie Silver, Debbie Friedman and Fleet Foxes.


WEB:   mikeypauker.com

VIDEOS: Yaish Lanu Aish Music Video | Wicker Man Music Video

 

Mikey Pauker

 

 

 

Do you approach life with a lens of Art? We want to hear from you!

All disciplines, all professions - Jews and peers of all denominations and ages - welcome!


 

 

 

 

GenToGen's Mission:  Utilizing media-rich + enterprising online social media interaction systems alongside active + traditional community-based engagement, GenToGen - a multi-channel, hybrid organization - aims to alleviate societal ailing on a micro (individual) and macro (community-wide) level via the fostering, nurturing and supporting of a sustainable Dynamic Hub for the Arts for Next Gen Jewish Artists and their Multi-Generational, Trans-Denominational + Trans-Disciplined peers.

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GenToGenPodcast - Episode 7 - Elyssa Moss Rabinowitz (Israel) [Producer, Entrepreneur, Artist] (Read full Interview at http://gentogen.podomatic.com)
July 05, 2011 01:50 PM PDT
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Main Photo: Students scroll

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"Moshe Rabbeinu. Umm, because basically he was the one that gave us the Torah. And, I'm sort of curious as [to], like, how he envisioned it panning out."

Elyssa Moss Rabinowitz on whom he'd want to meet to pick their brain over tea or coffee, GenToGen Podcast Interview, June 2011

http://gentogen.podomatic.com

Read the Interview Now

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Meaningful connections made and meaningful creations to be crafted.  

If I were to sum up the ROI Global Leadership Summit in Jerusalem that I have recently returned back to the States from attending, that first sentence would be it.  It was a pleasure to be back in Israel, but those connections made and those creations yet to be crafted, were - and are - the gems of the whole experience.  

While in Israel, I made the most of my almost two week adventure, taking time to enjoy Tel Aviv's Arts and Culture as much as I enjoyed intense and jam-packed days of networking and plenaries at the ROI Summit and thereafter, the Third Annual Presidential Conference, also held in Jerusalem.  Thankfully, I also had time to sit down for about 30 minutes for this special interview with Elyssa Moss Rabinowitz.

Most of what Elyssa does is like what I do, and vice-versa.  Naturally, I loved to pick her brain for a brief moment, as she shared her visions of the world as she approaches it through Art, while also sharing her thoughts about the Jewish Peoplehood, in general. 

Often while listening to this interview - and even during the transcription phase - I found myself feeling as though a mirror was being held up, and this mirror could not have come to fruition at a better time.

Enjoy the robust sounds of the ROI Summit Lab surrounding us as we knocked out this interview beneath a well-groomed tree at almost 2 or 3 in the morning...  But more so, I leave you with this: May you keep walking the path you were given, if nothing more than to find the other person who's walking that same path, but happens to just be approaching from the other end of the road.  Art, I see, truly is a halfway meet-up point to all things, people and places in life. 


WEB:

  http://www.kolhaot.com | http://twitter.com/kolhaot | FACEBOOK Page: Kol HaOt |

PRESS:

 http://www.jpost.com/Features/InThespotlight/Article.aspxid=216810&R=R44


 

To Arts,

Tera "Nova Jade* Greene
Creative Director + Visionary, GenToGen

Are you or do you know of any Los-Angeles Based Next Gen (21-33) Jewish Artists looking for more exposure and want to be a part of a dynamic Artist community? Well, GenToGen wants your tunes, art, poetry, et al! Please submit to: GenToGenLA@Gmail.com with the subject 'Artist Submission'. Submissions will be received on a rolling bases.  All submissions welcome regardless of generation, discipline or denomination.

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VIDEO: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TPz_gkm0ogo

Kol HaOt Activity Samples - Youtube

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Transcript Interview: Elyssa Moss Rabinowitz (Israel)

Download PDF From GOOGLE

 

E: Elyssa Moss Rabinowitz
T: Tera Greene

 

E: Under the Tree? *laughs*

T: Under the tree… meet me underneath the...

E: Mistle...

T: Mistle… bush?

E: Palm.

T: *laughs* Mistle-Palm

E/T: *Laughter*

 

T: Umm, OK, awesome. So, go ahead and state your name please.

E:  Uh, my name is Elyssa Moss Rabinowitz.

T:  And please describe six dynamic adjectives about you.

E: Dynamic?

T: Yes.

E: Umm. Creative. Detail-Oriented. Careful. Umm… Adventurous. Happy! 

T: And one more.

E: Oh, sorry. 

E/T: *laughter*

E: "Not-good-at-numbers…"

E/T: *laughter*

E: …I actually am sorta good at numbers, but not in this context.

T: *laughs* Fair enough… Is that your final answer?

E: Yes.

T: OK.  And what is your favorite cover? Color?

E:  When I asked… when I have to answer that question I usually say turquoise even though I don't, I don't really like having to focus on one color. Umm, I like lotsa colors.

T: You like lotsa colors? OK, but turquoise for the purpose of this interview?

E: Yes…

T: Awesome.

E: ...that will be my final answer.

T: *laughs* Umm, OK, so, now this is the "real" question here: What form of Art do you do?

E: So, I come from a background of, of uh, theatre and drama and I love to dance, umm, I love to sing… on shabbat. *laughs*. But, I would say the form of Art I do is actually - my Art - is to take different media and disciplines and bring them together into a new… whole… experience, and - and that's my - I see my Art in the Production, and the bringing together of different artistic elements to create a very, unified whole. 

T: Wow. That's awesome. OK, so - and is that a profession or a hobby?  

E: I would say it's a profession.  I have a production company called "A Day Away" where I produce events with Jewish content which I pull on all different Arts and disciplines and media to create these unified experiences. And I'm also now one of the founders of a new organization which is really devoted to - in a different, but similar way - umm, devoted to using the Arts - all of the Arts - to portray Jewish ideas, values and text. 

T: Wow. Amazing.  When did you start on the path of being a creative - umm, I guess how you can say - the creative "glue maker", if you will? *laughs*

E: That's a good way of putting it.  I guess I officially started when - soon after i finished University and I sort of had to decide what I wanted to do with myself and I am very blessed to have a father who himself is an Artist and an entrepreneur… and so, he actually allowed me to see the option of creating my own job and my own, umm, take on things.  And so, I guess - luckily - I've been pretty much doing that since, since i started working - I mean, I worked in high school before - but since I really started working… I have had a, you know, couple of "breaks" and worked in more regular... "employee jobs"?  

T: Uh huh. 

 E: …But I think all along I've always been creating this kind of Art. 

 

Students scroll

Students scroll


T: OK.  Describe a moment in time where Art truly healed you. 

E: Well, I'm gunna take that to the, like, most very basic level, I think. And that is… giving birth. And my - When my mother was giving birth to - was pregnant with me - umm, I grew up in Berkeley (editor's note: as in California!) and they were, ya know, hippies in Berkeley, and they did a Lamaze course - and, and one of the ideas of Lamaze is a natural child birth.  …is having a focal point - having something that you can focus on during the time that you're going through the contractions, etc. 

So my father, being an Artist, and being steeped richly in Jewish tradition, decided to take the ancient tradition of kame'as, which are like good luck charms in Judaism. They have, like, special wordings of text, and they've come, you know, traditionally, and historically, the come in certain shapes or, umm, ideas, but there, of course, there are a lot of traditions surrounding birth and the evil eye - and pushing away the evil eye -, and bringing in the right, good vibes…

T: Uh huh.

E: …So, so he took that idea and created a modern kame'a, a piece of artwork, where he took an ancient text and visual - created a visual - in a very modern way.  And my mother used that as her focal point for the Lamaze. And then, I was born! And then they decided, umm, it sort of - it sort of evolved: they started telling people about it and, and, over the years, besides my mother using it for her four children, they started lending it out to people, umm, as they, you know, were having their, their friends were having children. [inaudible] they started writing on the back on the picture all the babies that were sort of born under this good omen and it was still circulating, and in the family, when it came time for me to give birth to my first child and that was… extremely… healing and meaningful to me… to - to be able to, umm, have that continuity and, umm, and, that image - that visual image of that kame'a is very strong and healing in my - in my life - as a child, as a parent, and as a sort of generation passer-oner. *laughs* 

T: That's amazing.

E: …So I've now had the opportunity to use it for four children - umm, actually I'll correct that to say that my fourth came out really quickly so I didn't have enough time to have it right when she was born but I used it - a little bit afterwards. *laughs* Anyway…

T: Thank you for sharing that. 

E: My pleasure.

T: It was beautiful. What other forms of Art inspire you? I know you mentioned a lot.

E: Yeah, umm… I - The truth is I find that, any, any artist who really creates from within their heart and also focuses to make their Art - their craft - well done, I think can be a fantastic expression of their inner self. And so that can be, umm - I love, you know, visual art, I love dance, I'm very - I love to dance myself - and I'm very intrigued about that non-verbal communication of inner thoughts and feelings. Umm, for sure, drama, music… I like, puppetry, film, photography… basically *laughs*, whatever it is, I think that they're all tools.  I think that, that, you know, what really matters is not the vehicle, but the, umm, the fact that there is a vehicle to express something inner, and as long as you have figured out what it is you're trying to express and are working at perfecting the vehicle, and doing it in the best way you can, I think it can be very powerful. 

T: Sweet. Tell me: Who are your influences?

E: Well, definitely, significant influences in my life are both of my parents. My father, as I mentioned before, is a Jewish Artist.  I guess he started with very visual art, umm, calligraphy, paper cuts, illumination, umm, painting. But he's gone in a lot of different directions and now he's like, working with Architects, and building space design, and also working in wood with wood-cutters… really, very broad. Umm, and so that inter - I, obviously - that interdisciplinary thing has affected me in many ways and it's also effected me on the Jewish side of things because, umm, I - I - I got from him the importance of, really sort of grappling with who you are Jewishly and the significance of really expressing it in your life and not just letting it be sort of something about you, but something [where] you actually constantly are, are dealing with, are relating to, are, umm, identifying with… and my mother is also a big influence. She also has very artistic sides to her. She's a guide at the Israel Museum and a lover of Art; for sure, my love of dance I got from her. But I also got from her a lot of… how to deal with people. And how to, how to listen, how to nurture, and how to also stand up for yourself, and look out for yourself at the same time. And I think that's a a very interesting mix, which hopefully, I manage to walk the, the tightrope of, in my personal life. Umm, many other influences, but I can say those are the two that I'd like to mention now. 

T: So, GenToGen is about helping to Support the Arts and the Artists who create them while building a dynamic Jewish community that is trans-denominational, pluralistic and trans-disciplinary. Are you Jewish and if so, how do you approach your Jewishness (are you secular, traditional, cultural, young leadership, conservative, orthodox)?

E: So, yes, I am Jewish, and I - I guess if I had to use a label and a category I would define myself as a Modern-Orthodox Zionist… Umm, Modern-Orthodox in Israel and in the States have a little bit of a different connotation, but I guess, what I mean by Modern-Orthodox, is, is being Orthodox, and committed to Jewish law, while at the same time embracing the secular world and - of, you know, with all it has to offer in terms of - not all, but, *laughs* - [I] take the good things and umm, and… wait what was the other half of the question?

T: Well, basically, how do you approach your Jewishness? 

E: Oh how do I approach it? For me, I think my Jewishness is something that really drives everything I do and it's very important to me, even in my Artistic work.  Again, I see the Art as a vehicle; it's not a, it's not an end, it's a means and I've experienced and seen the power of the Arts - all the different - interdisciplinary, like you said, - but all the different disciplines, and for all the different denominations. Umm, through Art, you can address your Jewishness or grapple with Jewish issues, or explore Jewish text, or umm, decipher Jewish values, through the Arts in ways that you can't always do - or not everyone can do - without the Arts. It's um - it allows you to -, in a very non-threatening and creative way, to really get down to these core issues of "what does it mean to me to be Jewish?", and "what are my values?" and "what do I - how do I handle them?" And "how does it change my life or effect my life?", and I think that's a very powerful thing. 

T: I think that's powerful, too.  Yeah, I love what you said, that's a very, umm… You speak very well, but I think you have a good grasp on what Art is to you and though you're interdisciplinary, and you have all these goals, and everything - but it's very concise, and it's rooted in something. Umm, and I love how you express that.

E: Thank you.

Elyssa explaining art work
Elyssa explaining art work

 

T: Yeah, yeah. How does - I mean you already answered this - but how does your Jewish background influence your Art? 

E: [pause] Yeah, I sorta put that into the [beginning]. 

E/T: *laugh*

E: I could go on and on about it, but I think…

T: …Do you have anything you had to add? Or are you…

E: …umm. No. 

T: No. OK, 'Cuz you seem spot on to me, you know. 

E: Yeah, sorry. 

(Note: Again, it's the wee hours of the Jerusalem morning. We're hanging in there!)

T: How important is it to you to create Art that pushes the envelope and do you create that form of Art?

E: So it's interesting because we have - there are four partners in Kol HaOt, in our organization. And one of them, Yair, the, the hardcore Israeli, umm, he always says, "After people go through our programs, or go through an event we do or an exhibit we do, I want them to be bothered." That's what he calls it. He says, "I don't - I want them to walk out different than the way they walked in." And I think that that's very important because I might not use the word 'bothered', I would use… but to have some reaction, or to be transformed, or tickled in some way it could be a positive. It could be negative, it could be confused, but, but I would like to hope that any - anything we do - really causes people to react and gets them sort of out of that, like, nonchalantness, about daily life, umm… I think that's one of the purposes of our - of what we're doing. 

T: OK, and can you just elaborate a little bit more about your project and what you're doing?

E: Yeah, sure. The project is called Kol HaOt, the - "Illuminating Jewish Life Through Art" - and we're currently on our first phase which basically is - creates -  educational experiences for North American tourists visiting Israel, where we explore during these hour and a half long programs a certain Jewish theme or value or text using the Arts. So we use them in different ways: we both expose the participant to existing works of Art in, you know, an orchestrated way, and then also, there's always a hands-on component which allows them to then grapple with the issues themselves and create something themselves. So they're going through the Artistic process. And after being inspired, and seeing what other people have done, they can go through it and have, have the process and have something to take away from that experience. So, that's been - we have a whole menu of different programs that we offer. We're working with missions and synagogue tours and Bar and Bat Mitzvah tours, and family tours and senior tours and mostly adults, but also intergenerational… umm, some youth groups, some, you know, "gap year" programs while they're in Israel, so it's really, pretty varied. 

And that's been our first stage. We're focusing on developing these programs and executing them. And we're now, hopefully, G-d Willing, in the process of moving to our next stage, which is to create a home for Kol HaOt, which will be a physical… hub in Jerusalem, which will allow us to continue our educational activities, but also have alternating exhibits and a visual Beit Midrash.  Hopefully, a Caberet - a Jewish Caberet -, where there will be Performing Arts in the evening, all - all throughout, umm, the different projects, conveying Jewish ideas and values through these Arts. And we hope for it to become really a magnet for Artists, for lay-people, for educators, for tourists, who want - who are really looking to be touched, or bothered, or… tickled, while they're here in Jerusalem, by some Artistic Jewish experience. 

T: Great. Great. Sounds just like GenToGen, huh?

E: Yeah. There's a lot of commonality.

 

Students-Jewish Community High School of the Bay.03

Students - Jewish Community High School of the Bay


T: I love that. I love that. What are your biggest concerns for the world and how does Art help repair those concerns?

E: I think I'm gunna, like, limit it a little bit to the Jewish world. Because that's one of my, you know, biggest concerns right now from the point I'm in and I think one of the biggest concerns, to me in the Jewish world, is that we're getting to be very denominational, and very separated, and um, there's a lot of conflict from within. And I think, um, I think also… that we're losing people. And we're not just losing people in number - like I'm not talking about assimilation -, I'm talking about in terms of Jewish identity and identification and values and, and I think to address all of those issues, both the common denominators, and unity, I think Art is a great vehicle for that because it sort of equalizes people. You don't need to have a lot of text background, you don't need to have sat in Yeshiva for a million years in order to, to relate to these issues, if you have the doorway of the Art. 

I'm not saying it's not great if you have the opportunity to learn and delve into  text, but I think, in a way, Art sort of equalizes people and lets a lot of people come into the conversation at the same level. A. So that's the unity thing. And I think the other thing is, umm, in terms of the identity crisis, or the issue of losing people.  I think it's also a way to, to connect, to relate, to, to trigger a - I mean, Art is culture, right? And culture is what keeps us going. From Generation to Generation. As you… 

T: *laughs* Nice plug.

E: …as you [put it]. So I think, I think - I think it's traditionally it's been one of the purposes of Art is to help pass on culture and traditions, and so let's, let's hone in on that. Let's use that for - what - this challenge that we're facing of, like, losing people, of losing Jewish identity - losing the core Jewish values.

T: Wow. And where do you live?

E: I live here in Jerusalem, the Holy City!

T: Nice! *laughs*

E: I'm very privileged. 

T: *laughs* So what age group are you in? Are you The Golden Age (45+)? Are you the In-Between Generation (33-45)? Are you Next Gen (21-32), or are you Youth (under 20)?

E: Umm, according to those definitions I'm the "In-Between Generation". E/T: *laughs* 

T: Got it. OK, and so…

E: …although I don't really think of myself as between generations...

T: Wh- What do you -

E: …I'm at the HEIGHT Generation!

T: The "Height Generation".

E: No, it just keeps on getting better.

T: Awesome! I love that. I love that.

E: I actually - yeah, I really believe that I'm - I… you know, some people sort of look back fondly of "oh when we were young and everything was possible" and I just sort of feel like, like I loved that time, but now I'm in such a better place and I, like, just excited and looking forward to see where I'm gunna be in the future. So I do think it just keeps on getting better.

T: So it's the "Getting Better Age"? *laughs*

E: No, I'm saying at every age, it just gets better than it was before. So hopefully it will continue that way.

 

Adults - creating projects

Adults - creating projects

 

T: It will. *laughs* Umm, and how does your Art connect the different generations? 

E: Umm, well, first of all, in a very tangible way. When we do our programs, we work a lot with family groups because, like I said before, it's an equalizer, the Art is an entry level where you don't need a lot of pre-knowledge. So - at least the way we use it - what we call "teachable art". So, we can have a piece of Artwork that will elicit conversation betw- that will allow a parent and a child to discuss the meaning of [a] blessing for them, or the meaning of charity for them, through, you know, which is not an easy conversation to just sort of start in your daily life. But, by having the tool of the Art to discuss it - "What do you see here?" "How do you understand it?" "Why did the Artist choose to do this?" "Why did - what, you know, what… How do you interpret that?" - it's, it's a very easy entry-point and way to allow people from different generations to have discussions. And then, of course, once they've gotten there, they each bring from their richness and their experience and connect to each other so… really, it's just the trigger, I think, to allow them that space.

T: Why do you feel it is important to stay connected to all the generations?

E: First of all, for continuity. And second of all, I think there's a misnah in Avod that says "You should know where you come from and where you're going… And who stands - and who's going to give you judgement." That's the end. But, but I think it's very important for any person to, to know their past, and their future is rooted in their past. And so, the way we accomplish that is by having connections between generations. And, it's very basic to me. 

We used to - I lived for a little while in a small community and it was like a new community, so it was a lot of young families - or, young couples - this was before I had kids, umm, and it really bothered - we left there *laughs* - and it really bothered me that, I - I thought, "I can't bring up my kids in a place where everyone is the same age."  Like, I want them to meet old people, I want them to meet young people, I want, I want the old people to meet them. Umm, I want to have friends of different ages. I don't want to be like an ageist and only be within a circle of people my age, and I want to pass that on. I think there's a lot to learn from everyone at every stage and age, so…

T: I agree. So, what is your legacy? 

E: Hm, what does that mean?

T: What do you, umm, wish people to remember you by?

E: I, I guess if, um, - if people had a… - this is a little ambitious sounding -, but if people had one "ah-ha!" Jewish moment because of me, I would be very happy. Meaning that they'll remember me that I helped them, you know, learn, experience, grapple with, something Jewish for the first time, that, that's a success for me. 

T: Where do you see yourself in five years?

E: Well…

T: …and as an Artist - as it pertains to you Art?

E: Yes. I mean, hopefully, I would love for Kol HaOt to be a very successful venture by that point and really become a hub of activity - and I don't mean just a physical space but really a buzz where there, the idea of using the Arts for Jewish content is sort of trickled out to ever- to the whole Jewish world via the kind of tools and education that we're building and creating. 

T: Cool *laughs* 5 years is just around the corner!

E: Yea, it's a little ambitious. 

T: *laughs* Umm, OK, so last question: What are some of your BIGGEST, JUICIEST GOALS and how will your form of Art - the way that you express your Art - help you get there?

E: Biggest, juiciest goals… umm, well again, I think it's very similar to the other things I've been talking about. But really, to make an impact, and a change in the Jewish world. You know, change the Jewish people, or, or not "change them", but - but "benefit them". Umm, and I think, as I said before, that - that Art is a very strong and powerful way to accomplish that. To bring people together, to bring people.. to give, to, to make people consider their Jewish heritage and culture and not necessarily in a practicing way, but just in a value-based, identity aspect. 

T: OK. And actually, I flubbed a little bit, but it wasn't the last question, but...

E: I'll take one more… or two, I don't - I'm not good at numbers. *laughs* 

T: *laughs* Oh my goodness… If you could meet anyone to have, and sit down and have, tea or coffee with them, who would that be?

E: Umm, I think I'm gunna say Moshe Rabbeinu. Umm, because basically he was the one that gave us the Torah. And, and I'm sort of curious as [to], like, how he envisioned it panning out. And what he thinks about - I mean there's a, there's a traditional story in the Talmud about a Rabbi Akiva who came many generations after Moses and, and sort of like this imaginary conversation between them of like, Moses coming down and seeing what's going on in the Jewish world in Rabbi Akiva's time and watching him teach  and and say to him, like, "What is this? This isn't the Torah that I gave." And Rabbi Akiva saying, "Yes, this is, and it's evolved. And it's, it's a living, changing Torah… and that's what G-d wants." 

And so, I think, you know, it's time for another check in. For Moses to see what's going on now. And I would love to hear from him what he thinks about what is going on now. 

T: Wow. *laughs* That's awesome.  Well, thank you so much for taking time to be interviewed for GenToGen, be featured. I think it's so amazing that we're here at ROI, the Global Leadership Summit, and there's about 150 of us here and 4 days… but, yet I feel like I've known you guys for many years, I feel like I've been here for two weeks. *laughs*

E: … yeah I know. We're in this, like, time warp. 

T: … where in this time warp, exactly. But, the more I engage with each one of you, I realize that we're all connected. I mean, we really, really, are. And there are so many people that are doing Art and it's just amazing.  So…

E: … it is, and I feel, like, very blessed to have this opportunity because its, umm, you gotta know that there are other people out there doing things similar to you and believing in things that are similar to you. But, how to find them and connect to them - this is just, like, such perfect opportunity for that and I feel, like, very happy to have come across you, and met you and I definitely feel that there's a lot of, umm, collaboration options between Kol HaOt and GenToGen and in general between the two of us as individuals, as well, so… Thank you for this opportunity. 

T: You're very welcome. Thank you so much!

E/T: *laugh* 

T: Perfect.   

 

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Elyssa Moss Rabinowitz constructs worlds of Jewish meaning and beauty.  She is one of the co-founders of Kol HaOt, a new organization that uses the magical power of the arts in transformative, interactive programs that convey Jewish ideas, texts and values. She draws on all media to create interactive, participatory events and programs of Jewish content, through her “Day Away” programs, incorporating Jewish texts, music, food, art and drama to create all-encompassing experiences that are authentic, educational, inspirational and fun. She created and runs the “Zer Mitzvot” year-long group study/experience for Bat Mitzvah-aged girls and their mothers, and has worked on creative content for television programming, as well as acted and produced in live theater. She lives in Jerusalem with her husband, Dovi, and their four children.


WEB:

  http://www.kolhaot.com | http://twitter.com/kolhaot | FACEBOOK Page: Kol HaOt |

PRESS:

 http://www.jpost.com/Features/InThespotlight/Article.aspxid=216810&R=R44

 

Elyssa Moss Rabinowitz

 

 


 

 

GenToGen's Mission:  Utilizing media-rich + enterprising online social media interaction systems alongside active + traditional community-based engagement, GenToGen - a multi-channel, hybrid organization - aims to alleviate societal ailing on a micro (individual) and macro (community-wide) level via the fostering, nurturing and supporting of a sustainable Dynamic Hub for the Arts for Next Gen Jewish Artists and their Multi-Generational, Trans-Denominational + Trans-Disciplined peers.


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Do you approach life with a lens of Art? We want to hear from you!

All disciplines, all professions - Jews and peers of all denominations and ages - welcome!


 

 

GenToGenPodcast Announcement - Stay Tuned for Episode 7 Upload on June 27, 2011 [More at http://gentogen.podomatic.com]
June 26, 2011 11:54 PM PDT
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Dear listeners/readers!

I have a very special Podcast Episode to upload from my recent trip in Israel at the ROI Global Leadership Summit. Due to a little jet-lag and transitioning back home to also care for a sick elder, this week's episode will be posted Monday instead of the usual Sunday.

I apologize for any inconvenience!

Until then, please point your browsers to the following links... these are two blogs that I have written during my trip, and I hope they find you well:

NextGenJews Blog - Chailight: ROI Global Leadership Summit 2011

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Jewish Journal "Oy Gay" Blog - Young Global Leaders Converge at Summit

 

To Arts,

Tera "Nova Jade* Greene
Creative Director + Visionary, GenToGen

 

PS: Over the next few months I will also be revamping the look/feel of the site... Keep an eye out! Thanks for the support thus far.

GenToGenPodcast - Episode 6 - Leon Mostovoy [Editorial/Documentary Photographer] (Read full Interview at http://gentogen.podomatic.com)
June 12, 2011 04:28 PM PDT
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Main Photo: Nina, AIDS surviver daily shot interferion (photo by Leon Mostovoy)

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"Mary Ellen Mark I have always admired her art. Also Jeanne Winterson -  she has a great creative mind and writing style.  I think I could learn from them both. "

Leon Mostovoy on whom he'd want to meet to pick their brain over tea or coffee, GenToGen Podcast Interview, June 2011

http://gentogen.podomatic.com

Read the Interview Now

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My, oh my, it's a wonderful thing to get to know so many interesting Artists.  And when I mean Artists, I mean anyone who approaches life with a lens of Art.  I am currently in Jerusalem for the ROI Global Leadership Summit, and I had a lovely conversation with one of my fellow participants whom mentioned that he realized one day growing up that his grandpa, a denture maker, was an Artist.  I agree. I mean, artistry comes in so many forms, and teeth, if you will; above all, it isn't the medium, but it is the expression that makes the Art, in my humble opinion.

Leon Mostovoy is a transgender artist who has been on the front lines of creating queer and political art for decades.  He started his queer art career with publishing erotica for On Our Backs magazine in the early 1980s.

Most of his former photographic series have been about the struggles and triumphs of women as they strive for strength and independence living outside the lines of heteronormative expectations.

Art, in any form, is meant to create dialogue.

With so many schisms in the world, I am glad that I was introduced to Leon, because he allows me to remember that even though I am an open book, I am constantly expanding my comfort zone and his presence in my life is as pertinent as it is in yours. I have learned much from this interview, and it's so appropriate as Lynn Schusterman addressed us at the opening ROI session tonight and charged us with staying open and expanding our comfort zones at all times to be "change agents in the community and around the world."

So, as I get ready to hit the bed for a few hours before the next day of ROI Summiting, I give to you Leon.  May you find the common thread in his answers that resonate in your storytelling of Life. 

(All images in this podcast episode by Leon)


WEB:   leonmostovoy.wordpress.com



To Arts,

Tera "Nova Jade* Greene
Creative Director + Visionary, GenToGen

Are you or do you know of any Los-Angeles Based Next Gen (21-33) Jewish Artists looking for more exposure and want to be a part of a dynamic Artist community? Well, GenToGen wants your tunes, art, poetry, et al! Please submit to: GenToGenLA@Gmail.com with the subject 'Artist Submission'. Submissions will be received on a rolling bases.  All submissions welcome regardless of generation, discipline or denomination.

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From Death of my Daughter Series (F2M reincarnation)

From Death of My Daughter Series on F2M reincarnation


Six dynamic adjectives about Leon Mostovoy:

Passionate, strong-minded, creative, morally-just, determined, loving... proud. (He's earned 7 adjectives :-) )

Leon's favorite color:

midnight blue

What form of Art do you do? (Ie. How do you Make Beautiful the world)

Editorial and documentary Photography.

Is this a profession or hobby?

It was the way I made my living for 20 yrs. My career is now in administration to design, produce, direct, collaborate and hire other artists to teach many forms of art to inner city, under served youth in an after school program. [I'm] therefore living vicariously though these projects. My art is in the status of more money [being] put out than the projects put back in [to my pocket].

I can understand about the finances.  Which is why one of the components and mission of GenToGen is to help eradicate the idea of a "starving artist".  I look forward to following up with you once that education component starts to roll out! Now, tell us, when did you start on the path of your Art?

Age 18.

Good age! Next, describe a moment in time where Art truly healed you.

Getting a positive reaction and support from family members from my photography series and film Death Of My Daughter - which is about parental expectations - and my parents cutting [me] out of their lives and choosing to never speak to me after I informed them of my decision to transition from female to male.

What other forms of Art inspire you?

Movies and literature. I made my first doc short this year and am proud to say it has been accepted to Frameline, Outfest and a few other festivals.

Congrats! My film Queerer Than Thou (co-produced by Kalil Cohen, a GenToGen Feature), were at those festivals.  You are in the big time! So, let's go back. Please tell me -  who are your influences?

Mary Ellen Mark, Larry Clark, Joel Peter Wilkens, Diana Arbus, Velvet Underground, Rimbaud, Sartre, Izzy Pop, all things punk rock 1976-80.

Wow, that's great that you like punk rock.  You're making me a fan of you more and more as this interview goes on.  But, I digress...  GenToGen is about helping to Support the Arts and the Artists who create them while building a dynamic Jewish community that is trans-denominational, pluralistic and trans-disciplinary. Are you Jewish and if so, how do you approach your Jewishness (are you secular, traditional, cultural, young leadership, conservative)?

I was raised in LA in a secular family. I relate on a cultural basis. I also agree with a lot of the spiritual aspects and guidelines of living a just life.

So, how does your Jewish background influence your art?

I think that Jewish culture has a lot to do with standing up for the rights of people and personal freedom. My work has always been political and about giving a voice to the unheard.

Leon, Gender Variant Masculine Fashion Book
Leon, Gender Variant Masculine Fashion Book

How important it is to you to create Art that provokes or pushes the envelope?  Do you create such a form of Art?

Work that pushes and makes people question standards is what I'm most interested it viewing, making, and collaborating with other like minded people. It [is] my opinion [that] art is made to develop and define history and culture.

Where do you currently live?

Highland Park (Los angeles)

Nina, AIDS surviver, uses her blood as make up

Nina, AIDS surviver, uses her blood as make up

Leon, what are your biggest concerns for the world and how does Art help repair those concerns?

My concern is that people that don't fit neatly into the social norm are not treated equally socially or politically.  My work it about challenging these social norms.

What age group are you in? The Golden Age (45+), the In-Between Gen (33-45), Next Gen (21-32), Youth    

(laughs) The Golden Age, why do you call it that? Perhaps in my case it's because I still have a hint of blond in my hair.

Haha.  I don't know why I call it that.  Because you all are so golden! I think I heard that term somewhere.  Feel free to suggest another name... How about 'The Fabulous Age?' :-)  With that, how does your Art connect the different generations, Golden Man?

My art is about queer life and the struggle and triumphs of queers. I think we all have some the same issues, fears, hurts, challenges, goals, strengths, and power no matter the age.

Why do you feel it is important to stay connected to all generations?

One can learn best by keeping connected to those that are different from themselves. Different generations have different goals, or different ways of viewing - or getting to - the same goal. [Individual diversity] can be a strong way of connecting and getting the job of changing the world done. Working with all people in all age groups is important.

So, what's your legacy?

Queer art activist.

Where do you see yourself in 5 years?

In the 1980-90's I did a lot of work in the queer arena, fighting for equality i feel the next 5 years will be about putting my work back into the world giving a voice and identity to the transgender community.

Last question, what are some of your BIGGEST, JUICIEST GOALS and how will your form of Art help you get there?

My personal goals are to have many people view my art and learn something about themselves and the people I celebrate in my art. To reach my goal I need more exposure and hope that will happen. I am working on it right now.

Leon, you have opened my eyes with you candidness and your Artistry.  I hope that GenToGen can help facilitate more exposure for you.  Let me know how to help you.  I appreciate you taking the time to be interviewed and to share your story on our podcast.

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Leon Mostovoy is a transgender artist who has been on the front lines of creating queer and political art for decades.  He started his queer art career with publishing erotica for On Our Backs magazine in the early 1980s. Most of his former photographic series have been about the struggles and triumphs of women as they strive for strength and independence living outside the lines of heteronormative expectations.


WEB:    leonmostovoy.wordpress.com

Leon Mostovoy

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

GenToGen's Mission:  Utilizing media-rich + enterprising online social media interaction systems alongside active + traditional community-based engagement, GenToGen - a multi-channel, hybrid organization - aims to alleviate societal ailing on a micro (individual) and macro (community-wide) level via the fostering, nurturing and supporting of a sustainable Dynamic Hub for the Arts for Next Gen Jewish Artists and their Multi-Generational, Trans-Denominational + Trans-Disciplined peers.

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GenToGenPodcast - Episode 5 - Toby Branz [Soprano Opera Singer] (Read full Interview at http://gentogen.podomatic.com)
May 29, 2011 08:53 PM PDT
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Main Photo: Overture to Giulio Cesare (photo by Betsy Kershner)

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"Ani Difranco. I have always loved her."

Toby Branz on whom she'd want to meet to pick their brain over tea or coffee, GenToGen Podcast Interview, May 2011

http://gentogen.podomatic.com

Read the Interview Now

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My, oh my, how small the Artistic world is... and especially the Jewish Arts world, even if miles of road are betwixt us.  Kalil Cohen called to my attention another wonderful feature for the GenToGen Artist community, and I am really happy that he did... I've met and admired this artist via shared videos of her performances form other mutual friends over the years - and she's fun to hang out with in person, too.  But there was something about listening to this next feature online on my MacBookPro the other day that made my ears happy.  No, really, if ears could smile, my ears would appear to be a fully-grinning mouth.

 Toby Branz is a sonic delight.  I spent time on her website, browsing through photos and such, but really was captivated by her clear, aural mastery of intonation, inflection and air while listening to The Jewel Song from Faust that you can easily tune into in the "listen" section of her official online home.

In consistency with allowing the Artists to express themselves in the way that would best capture their essence, I asked her to submit a bio, and this is the gem of goodness that was delivered to my inbox:

Toby Branz is a classically trained opera singer.  She received her Master's of Music from the San Francisco Conservatory of Music in 2010, and her Postgraduate Diploma in Vocal Performance, also from the San Francisco Conservatory of Music, in 2011.  She and her fiancée, photographer Betsy Kershner (www.betsykershner.com) will be singing and taking photos in Spoleto, Italy this summer as part of University of Cincinnati's CCM Spoleto program.  She is also performing her recital "Cabaret and Les nuits d'été" on June 5 in Santa Barbara and June 17 in San Francisco.  Come join in the fun!

So without further ado, the curtains are coming up and it is time to join in the fun of this gifted, soprano, whom with each note, in my opinion, helps to breathe beautiful life into our world through her Art. Do me and the rest of us a HUGE favor and make sure you check out her website to hear her vocal samples, yeah? Yes!

Cheers!


WEB:    http://www.tobybranz.com



To Arts,

Tera "Nova Jade* Greene
Creative Director + Visionary, GenToGen

Are you or do you know of any Los-Angeles Based Next Gen (21-33) Jewish Artists looking for more exposure and want to be a part of a dynamic Artist community? Well, GenToGen wants your tunes, art, poetry, et al! Please submit to: GenToGenLA@Gmail.com with the subject 'Artist Submission'. Submissions will be received on a rolling bases.  All submissions welcome regardless of generation, discipline or denomination.

*

Toby Branz - Photo by Betsy Kershner

Six dynamic adjectives about Toby Branz:

Expansive, exuberant,  extroverted, engaged, loud, and loving.

Toby's favorite color:

   It's a tie between fuschia and turquoise.

Great choices for color.  They're both vibrant and lovely.  So, Toby, tell us, what form of Art do you do? (Ie. How do you Make Beautiful the world)

   I am an opera singer.

Is this a profession or hobby?

   This is my career!

Fantastic! When did you start on the path of singing opera?

   I started singing seriously about 5 years ago.

Describe a moment in time where Art truly healed you.

    When I went through my first bad breakup, drawing helped me a lot.

I understand, completely.  Drawing is a form of art that is quite healing. What other forms of Art inspire you?

    I love visual art, especially drawing.

From what I hear in your voice, I'd love to see what you create visually! Tell me who are your influences?

    I am very influenced by my family and my amazing teacher, Catherine Cook.

GenToGen is about helping to Support the Arts and the Artists who create them while building a dynamic Jewish community that is trans-denominational, pluralistic and trans-disciplinary. Are you Jewish and if so, how do you approach your Jewishness (are you secular, traditional, cultural, young leadership, conservative)?

    I think of myself as a cultural Jew, although I was raised in a Conservative synagogue and had a Bat Mitzvah.

So, how does your Jewish background influence your art?

    Music, art, and education have always been core values in my family and my Jewish community.  My family has always been very supportive of my singing (and drawing, and violin-playing), and I think that is how I have most been shaped by my "Jewishness".  I couldn't be where I am today without my family.

Toby Branz, Giulio Cesare - Photo by Betsy Kershner
 Toby Branz, Giulio Cesare - Photo (c) Betsy Kershner

How important it is to you to create Art that provokes or pushes the envelope?  Do you create such a form of Art?

     I think that every time I can honestly connect to a character and sing and act onstage from my truth, I am doing my job.  I hope that I will get a chance to work with wonderful directors, composers, and conductors throughout my career to create productions that are truly provocative. But as a singing actress I can only do my piece the best that I can, and just hope that the audience gets something from my performance.

Where do you currently live?

     I live in San Francisco.

Toby Branz, SFGate (February 18, Cesare)

Toby Branz, SFGate (February 18, Giulio Cesare)


Toby, as a person residing in SF, a town with progressive ideas and Artists, what are your biggest concerns for the world and how does Art help repair those concerns?

      Hmmm... I think I am afraid that we will all become disconnected from one another.  I would like to think that through music-making, I can help people communicate with each other, and also connect more fully to themselves.

What age group are you in? The Golden Age (45+), the In-Between Gen (33-45), Next Gen (21-32), Youth    

      Editor's note: The Artist disclosed her age, but we'll just say she is Next Gen and allow you to suss out her real age!

How does your Art connect the different generations?

      I am a musical storyteller, and people of all ages like seeing and hearing stories set to music.

Why do you feel it is important to stay connected to all generations?

      Because we are all human beings, and we all can learn from each other!

Right - plain and simple! So, what's your legacy, Toby?

      Not quite sure how to answer that one.

Fair enough.  Maybe this one will resonate: where do you see yourself in 5 years as an opera singer?

    ...My 5-year plan is constantly evolving.  In my industry (opera), "success" is so tricky and hard to come by that I have started to feel it is almost a trap I am setting for myself if I create specific expectations of where I will be in 5 years.  My general "career" plan, as of now, is to perform on opera stages all over the country and the world.  But we'll see where life takes me...

We shall see, indeed!  Last question, what are some of your BIGGEST, JUICIEST GOALS and how will your form of Art help you get there?

      I just want to make music!  I love opera - it is such a grand art form with such a rich history - and I think there are a lot of opportunities within it to really shake things up and make some profound art.

I second that. And, for what it's worth, i hope you keep making music and sharing your voice, because the world can use some profound Art and substantial Artists, these days.  I appreciate your gift and thank you for taking the time to speak with the GenToGen Podcast... next up, we have to get Betsy to agree to an interview!

Toby Branz is a classically trained opera singer.  She received her Master's of Music from the San Francisco Conservatory of Music in 2010, and her Postgraduate Diploma in Vocal Performance, also from the San Francisco Conservatory of Music, in 2011.  She and her fiancée, photographer Betsy Kershner (www.betsykershner.com) will be singing and taking photos in Spoleto, Italy this summer as part of University of Cincinnati's CCM Spoleto program.  She is also performing her recital "Cabaret and Les nuits d'été" on June 5 in Santa Barbara and June 17 in San Francisco.  Come join in the fun!


WEB:    http://www.tobybranz.com/

Toby Branz

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

GenToGen's Mission:  Utilizing media-rich + enterprising online social media interaction systems alongside active + traditional community-based engagement, GenToGen - a multi-channel, hybrid organization - aims to alleviate societal ailing on a micro (individual) and macro (community-wide) level via the fostering, nurturing and supporting of a sustainable Dynamic Hub for the Arts for Next Gen Jewish Artists and their Multi-Generational, Trans-Denominational + Trans-Disciplined peers.

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GenToGenPodcast - Episode 4 - Yom Haatzmaut (Read full post at http://gentogen.podomatic.com)
May 15, 2011 07:09 PM PDT
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Main Photo: Pretty Plant in Israel 2010

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http://gentogen.podomatic.com

The GenToGen Blog - http://gentogen.co.cc (last updated 5-15-11)

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Happy Birthday, Israel! Yom Haatzmaut has come and gone this year, but the party isn't stopping... I will be happily heading to Israel in less than a month to participate in the 2011 ROI Summit in Jerusalem with 140 other Young Global Leaders in Innovation, so in essence, the fun is just getting started.

There are more fabulous GenToGen Podcast artist interviews to come in a couple of weeks, but until then, enjoy this episode of music: LA Way Birthright Reunion Mix - Part 2 previously mixed live by DJ Nova Jade* (Various artists. World/Israeli/Gypsy/Balkan).

Be sure to read our first three interviews if you've not done so already:

Laurel Johnson (Photography)

 Kalil Cohen (aka MetaHuman)

 Janelle Eagle (Documentarian)

And send all inquiries/recommendations to: GenToGenLA@Gmail.Com



To Arts,

Tera "Nova Jade* Greene
Creative Director, GenToGen

Are you or do you know of any Los-Angeles Based Next Gen (21-33) Jewish Artists looking for more exposure and want to be a part of a dynamic Artist community? Well, GenToGen wants your tunes, art, poetry, et al! Please submit to: GenToGenLA@Gmail.com with the subject 'Artist Submission'. Submissions will be received on a rolling bases.  All submissions welcome regardless of generation, discipline or denomination.

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GenToGen's Mission:  Utilizing media-rich + enterprising online social media interaction systems alongside active + traditional community-based engagement, GenToGen - a multi-channel, hybrid organization - aims to alleviate societal ailing on a micro (individual) and macro (community-wide) level via the fostering, nurturing and supporting of a sustainable Dynamic Hub for the Arts for Next Gen Jewish Artists and their Multi-Generational, Trans-Denominational + Trans-Disciplined peers.

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GenToGenPodcast - Episode 3 - Janelle Eagle [Documentarian] (Read full Interview at http://gentogen.podomatic.com)
May 01, 2011 10:52 PM PDT
itunes pic

 

Main Photo: Janelle in India (Glowing Marble)

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"I have dreamed about meeting Hope Edelman... I want to tell her that her words changed my life and have inspired me. I want to compare stories and learn from her experience and film the whole conversation. As an artist, I'd like to say that I am happy to put my work out there, wherever it may go. But the truth is, I want to know that it affects people. I absolutely want to hear stories from fans or viewers that had their mind changed because of something I created. Being able to sit down with Hope and let her know that she has done that for me would be an honor."

Janelle Eagle, GenToGen Podcast Interview, May 2011

http://gentogen.podomatic.com

Read the Interview Now

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May is here.  After a month of major global changes, mercury in retrograde, and Pass(ing)over yeast-based foods, we are now in the month that by rhyme will bring flowers, and by respect, will bring many of those flowers to Mothers for Mother's Day... I've personally never celebrated mother's day by way of being raised by a single-parent father since basically day one, but a few days ago I was told by a friend that he's having a child and wants me to be the godmother. I'm no idol, I'm no "god", but I guess instinctually, I am worthy of being called mother.  Kalil Cohen rounded out the month of April quite well, but in the spirit of the motherly month of May, it is now time to feature another female GenToGen Artist.

 Janelle Eagle is a force.  I will forever remember the day we first met - March 4, 2009. I had just flown in from being on location in Florida for a couple of months as a composer for a 30-person, hour-long, original dance-opera project, and met her at a meeting for a JQ International fundraiser that turned out to be something I become involved with and am now a 3-year DJ of.  I met Janelle briefly at that meeting before I marched over to a march for LGBT rights (re: Prop 8) that I'd help create the movement that was broadcast to the world after I was one of the first thousand marchers on the ground after the unwanted - and still being fought - decision came through in CA on Election Day 2008 supporting Prop 8's message.  That singular day, March 4th, with me being so busy, but still capturing a small window to sit immersed amongst Janelle's power, has basically been how our relationship has worked since, with huge collaborations and then "hiatuses" from each other as we fly high to achieve our individual life pursuits.  Yet, our lives are so synchronistically woven that the hiatus never seems long, and her presence is so huge that I couldn't miss her if I tried.

If you are in the world, then you have met Janelle. Virtually, or through one of her many, many connections to so many walks of human diverse life.  Janelle is not just a documentarian, she is a humanitarian with a passion to think big, take action and follow through to see results.  She is a prolific and engaging writer/blogger, a person with a gift for networking and smart as a very smart whistle.

 So I'm rooting for her because I believe so much that - and you can mark my words - Janelle Eagle will indeed help change our world's consciousness.  How do I know? She already is. And how appropriate that on the day that I am posting her interview, Obama has just addressed the end of Osama, and I viewed it at the wrap of this year's fundraiser that she and I met to plan for the first time 3 years ago.  Synchronicity and going in circles, but spiraling upward. 

There truly is always a journey when you merge paths with Janelle.

Enjoy the journey of getting to know this pioneer. Cheers!


WEB:    www.journeywithjanelle.com



To Arts,

Tera "Nova Jade* Greene
Creative Director + Visionary, GenToGen

Are you or do you know of any Los-Angeles Based Next Gen (21-33) Jewish Artists looking for more exposure and want to be a part of a dynamic Artist community? Well, GenToGen wants your tunes, art, poetry, et al! Please submit to: GenToGenLA@Gmail.com with the subject 'Artist Submission'. Submissions will be received on a rolling bases.  All submissions welcome regardless of generation, discipline or denomination.

*

Janelle filming in Nepal

Six dynamic adjectives about Janelle Eagle:

Passionate

Empathetic

Stubborn

Contemplative

Enthusiastic

Ready 

Janelle's favorite color:

   Teal. It was one of my bat-mitzvah colors, too. But I'm not talking about sea-blue, sea-green, or anything like that. It's that perfect middle ground between green and blue that you see sometimes when you're flying over water that is so clear you can see the sea bed below. 

What form of Art do you do? (Ie. How do you Make Beautiful the world)

   The world is already beautiful! I am a documentarian who strives to expose that beauty with film, videography, and photography. My goal is to use the power of media to inspire others to create the change they want to see. That manifests itself with producing independent features (like the forthcoming "A Perfect Ending") and directing and filming documentaries like the two I've made in Nepal about some inspiring kids who've got a whole lot of love to give. Telling these stories has provided me the opportunity to travel all over the world: Indonesia, Thailand, Laos, Cambodia, Nepal, India, Euro-railed through 7 countries, been to Israel and all over the United States. I consider it my job to witness the world's beauty and share it.

Is this a profession or hobby?

   It takes too much work to be successful in the film industry for it to be a hobby. The number of free gigs, long hours, and teeny tiny paychecks that are required would make it impossible to have this be a side-gig. I've made great sacrifices for this profession that I love. I'm all in!

All in is the only way! ;-) And when did you start doing your Art?

   It all started when I left a cushy job and decided to pack up and move to Ohio to work for the Obama campaign in the fall of 2008. Being on the ground and walking door to door made me feel much closer to the issues that were surrounding me on the news and I felt empowered being able to write, photograph, and BE the change. I never looked back after we won that election and began pounding the pavement back in my home state of California, and figuring out how to make travel happen in my life. I began carrying a camera with me wherever I went and the story tells itself from there, I guess! 

Copy that. Now, describe a moment in time where Art truly healed you.

           One year into my decision to leave the normalcy and stability of a "real job," I was financially strapped and unsure of whether I'd made the right decision. I was creating content, but it seemed unimportant and wasn't getting me the foot in the door that I was hoping for. I was feeling scared and vulnerable. In a weird and unexpected moment, I suddenly found myself being given an opportunity to make my first documentary film in Nepal. No one handed us the camera and a pile of money, but when I finally found that hook, that thing that I needed in order to feel inspired to keep going, it showed up. We raised funds and used credit cards and got ourselves halfway around the world and being on the streets of Kathmandu changed me. Running on rooftops with my cameras and truly seeing the beauty I'd been watching on NatGeo made me know that I had made the right decision.

What other forms of Art inspire you?

           Music is SO crucial to my spirit. While everyone around me complains about having to drive a car in LA traffic, I'm the girl that is stoked to have some free time to myself where I can blast some Mumford & Sons, be inspired, and sing my heart out while trying to get from point A to point B. I'm a great karaoke buddy.

Cool! Mumford & Sons have a lovely sound... which brings me to ask, who are your influences?

           I started out thinking I was going to be a travel correspondent, so the mood and feel of a lot of my earlier work is definitely inspired by Anthony Bourdain's sassy approach to talking about how the world moves. I watch an unearthly amount of documentaries and National Geographic specials, so I'm constantly feeding my artistic appetite with the work of so many great documentarians. 

           For my narrative work in feature film, I've had the incredible blessing of working with some special people. Ned Farr and Nicole Conn are absolutely amazing directors and I've learned so much from both.

           The biggest influence on my personal motivation and life viewpoint (other than my parents) is a woman named Hope Edelman. She wrote a piece about all the hard times that show up when you follow your passion. She taught me that the biggest need is to "float" on life's river and stop fighting the current. Reading that passage (while on a beach in Bali, I might add) literally changed my life. It's on my website if anyone else wants to be inspired.

GenToGen is about helping to Support the Arts and the Artists who create them while building a dynamic Jewish community that is trans-denominational, pluralistic and trans-disciplinary. Are you Jewish and if so, how do you approach your Jewishness (are you secular, traditional, cultural, young leadership, conservative)?

           I was raised reform and was extremely active in the Jewish community of the Eastern San Francisco Bay Area. I did all the Jewey things I could do- summer camp, youth group, summer in Israel, etc. When I got to college (at the infamously anti-semitic UC Irvine), I found myself without a community connection to my religion. When I moved to LA after graduating and found an organization called "JQ International," I met a ton of other Queer Jews like myself. Suddenly I was back in the swing of things, hosting shabbat dinners, planning events, and even working a stint at the Jewish Federation. It's clear to me that my religion is also my culture, and when I have a community to celebrate it with, I'm as connected as can be.

How does your Jewish background influence your art?

             My Jewish background has influenced the perspective that I have when I approach my art. I'm a triple minority: Female, Jewish, Queer, but I pass for any sort of majority that exists. This means I have knowledge of what it feels like to be "in" as well as what it feels like to be misunderstood and underrepresented. It makes sense to me that as a result of that life experience, many of my projects focus on unheard voices, marginalized communities, and the underdog.

Janelle - Nepal 2010
 

How important it is to you to create Art that provokes or pushes the envelope?  Do you create such a form of Art?

             I don't know if I push an artistic envelope, but I am definitely not afraid of tackling subjects that seem taboo. Why make ART unless it says something that no one's heard before?

Where do you currently live?

             I am a rare-bird, you see. Many of the peers in my age group constantly change apartments and locations, but I have lived in the same apartment in West Hollywood for 5 years now. With a combination of subletters and really understanding roommates, I've traveled all over the world and crashed on a few couches during that time. Sometimes I am gone for months at a time without any of the luxuries that WeHo provides, but the same place has served as my home base for quite some time now. If I didn't have the stability of knowing I had a place to come back to, I'm not sure I'd be so willing to take chances.

Janelle in San Francsico


Going from the local to the global, what are your biggest concerns for the world and how does Art help repair those concerns?

           What a big question. Beyond the obvious: global warming, nuclear fallout, and holy wars, I think we, as people, lack empathy. When we don't understand each other, we can't see outside ourselves and our situation. That sort of mentality fuels awful human qualities like greed, homophobia, and bigotry. I would say that at least 90% of the motivation I have for doing my work is to allow people to truly hear and see each other. When the power of words and images are combined, it's hard not to have a change of perspective. My ART aims to build that sense of empathy, understanding, and interconnectedness.

What age group are you in? The Golden Age (45+), the In-Between Gen (33-45), Next Gen (21-32), Youth    

           Next Gen all the way!

How does your Art connect the different generations?

           I couldn't have done the work that I've done without the mentors that have given me opportunities to shine. Every single piece that I do is the direct result of someone investing in me. The folks on the ground with me when I am filming, traveling, and editing are all my age and equally driven to succeed. We're on the cusp of great success. The younger generation are our consumers and our subjects. ...ART is an exchange across generations no matter how you look at it. 

Why do you feel it is important to stay connected to all generations?

            Here is another area where Judaism has directly affected the decisions that I make. My favorite Judaic concept is "L'dor V'dor," from generation to generation. I would not be who I am today without the love, support and knowledge that I gained from my grandmother, parents, and multiple mentors that have invested in my future. I am surrounded by peers that inspire me every day, that guide and support me and whom I can't help but want to see be successful. Those that have youth on their side have all the opportunity in the world. I want them to achieve greatness. They have more tools and opportunity than any generation before them and in their future, I see that world of empathic humanity that I dream of. 

What's your legacy, Janelle?

            I want to be that girl that people remember rooting for the underdog. I want to be a respected Producer, mother, and partner that balances a busy personal life and professional career. 

...And where do you see yourself in 5 years as a documentarian?

    In 5 years, I will be a full-time Producer of narrative feature independent films and documentaries about the unheard voices of our generation.

 On that same note, what are some of your BIGGEST, JUICIEST GOALS and how will your form of Art help you get there?

           I want LGBTQ equal rights, female empowerment in third world countries, and access to education for all children. Lofty right? I hope that by telling the stories that I tell, that the words and images inspire the powers that be (and that includes US) to make that change.

It's funny, I think I have "lofty" goals, too... But, maybe, Janelle, this is why you and I seem to be running alongside each other, distance apart aside.  Loft away, Eagle!

Janelle K. Eagle is a documentarian. Whether it be video, photography, or writing, her passion is to experience as much as possible and share the journey with anyone interested in being inspired and uplifted by stories that change hearts and minds.

Hailing originally from Northern California, Janelle made the permanent drive down Interstate 5 and has planted herself firmly in the glow of SoCal’s gorgeous beaches. Don’t envision her lounging on sand though; Janelle is constantly on the move filming and creating content for her personal website as well as the multitude of clients that hire her for her enthusiasm, professionalism, and high-quality results.

Janelle’s work has been featured on Lonely Planet, the National Geographic website, as well as sites for niche audiences including the “Jewish Journal” and “GayTravel.com.” Her videos (filming & editing) have been commissioned by clients ranging from an NFL Football star to a Las Vegas tourism company.

The dream is to experience. Whether in front of or behind the camera, Janelle is inspired by the human stories that guide us and our generations past and present as we negotiate the inevitable obstacles of life created both by ourselves and nature. If you’d like to work with Janelle, you can contact her by clicking HERE TO EMAIL.


WEB:    www.journeywithjanelle.com

Janelle Captures the Obamas Learning the Wave (2008)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

GenToGen's Mission:  Utilizing media-rich + enterprising online social media interaction systems alongside active + traditional community-based engagement, GenToGen - a multi-channel, hybrid organization - aims to alleviate societal ailing on a micro (individual) and macro (community-wide) level via the fostering, nurturing and supporting of a sustainable Dynamic Hub for the Arts for Next Gen Jewish Artists and their Multi-Generational, Trans-Denominational + Trans-Disciplined peers.

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GenToGenPodcast - Episode 2 - Kalil Cohen [MetaHuman] (Read full Interview at http://gentogen.podomatic.com)
April 17, 2011 11:19 PM PDT

Minicast Photos - Kalil Cohen (Metahuman); Queerer Than Thou (QTT) Title Shot; QTT Film Still; QTT Film Still; Kalil Cohen (Metahuman); Metahuman (Photo by Happyland/Liz Acosta Photography).

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"...I would love to meet and speak with Margaret Cho.  I think she has done an absolutely amazing job of staying true to herself and representing queer people of color, while gaining access to the mainstream media and the huge exposure that comes with it.  She is such a talented and creative and funny performer, and she manages to reach millions and millions of people.  I would love to hear more about how she manages to that, and how she stays sane and balanced in the world of mainstream media."

Kalil Cohen, GenToGen Podcast Interview, April 2011

http://gentogen.podomatic.com

Read the Interview Now

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What a month! It's amazing to believe that it's time for the 2nd post of the GenToGen Podcast... time is flyin'!  There's already been a great response to the first podcast with photographer, Laurel Johnson, and as I literally get ready to fly on an airplane, I'm looking forward to see the response for this episode's featured GenToGen Artist.

 Kalil Cohen is someone whom I hold dear to my heart.  We have co-produced a film called Queerer Than Thou that has screened at over 60 film festivals on four continents and I have helped coach him to perform his first poem ever in front of an audience.  I'm still in awe of the fact that it seemed like just yesterday I helped him record his first ever song in the studio, and then - unexpectedly - help him get a scholarship for a track we recorded at that time, as well.  But, of all the moments, I will always hold dear the day when I was his best Boi at his most-awesome wedding to his most-beautiful wife. 

I could write a book about this fine gentleman, about where we've been and where we're going, but this is his moment to shine, and I now excitedly bring you Kalil Cohen in twenty questions so that you can get a vision yourself of just how HUGE his impact in this world is.  
 Sometimes a person happens to plop in your life through mutual friends, and they just stick.  Make sure you 'like' Kalil on his Facebook Page to stay up to date because he's got the right glue to stick to your heart and open your mind.

Cheers!

WEB:    www.metahumanmusic.com www.tgfilmfest.com

Youtube - ReelBoiProductions | FAN PAGE: http://on.fb.me/e8tnGZ

To Arts,

Tera "Nova Jade* Greene
Creative Director + Visionary, GenToGen

 

Are you or do you know of any Los-Angeles Based Next Gen (21-33) Jewish Artists looking for more exposure and want to be a part of a dynamic Artist community? Well, GenToGen wants your tunes, art, poetry, et al! Please submit to: GenToGenLA@Gmail.com with the subject 'Artist Submission'. Submissions will be received on a rolling bases.  All submissions welcome regardless of generation, discipline or denomination.

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Metahuman performs - GenderJustice LA

Six dynamic adjectives about Kalil Cohen:
       Creative, engaging, energetic, thoughtful, persistent, multifaceted.

Kalil's favorite color:
      Blue.  I love many different shades of blue, but especially turquoise.

What form of Art do you do?
           I am primarily focused on making films, however I am also a poet, hip hop artist, and graphic designer.
 
Are these professions or hobbies?
         At the moment it is both because I do earn part of my living from my film work and live performances and writing, but I also have other part-time jobs to supplement this income.  Eventually I hope to be an artist and arts organizer full-time.
 
Right on. Let's go back to the beginning - when did you start doing your Art?
       I have been a writer since I was five years old and started my first journal. I used to write long illustrated stories as a child, which I continue to do as a filmmaker today. I began writing poetry in my teens, which later expanded to include song lyrics as well. I started writing movie concepts in 2004 when I began working on my documentary short "Queering Gender" (2005).

Describe a moment in time where Art truly healed you.
            I am often inspired by negative situations I’ve experienced or things I’ve read about in the news.  For instance, when I went to a protest and witnessed police brutality against demonstrators it inspired the song May Day in LA. I often spoof these experiences or turn them into jokes in order to heal myself, or to build strength to resist these situations.  Although this sounds really serious, the actual art that comes out of it is often lighthearted and funny.  It is very powerful to combat negativity with humor.  Also, when I am performing for majority-straight audiences, or people who don’t identify with radical politics, humor helps opens people up to hearing about unfamiliar experiences or ways of thinking.

What other forms of Art inspire you?
           Novels.  I love the way that a great book can take you completely away from where you are, more so than a film in some ways, because it is all going on inside your own head, a co-creation between yourself and the author.

You are a very multi-faceted artist. Who are your influences?
            I am greatly influenced by contemporary transgender and genderqueer filmmakers including Silas Howard, Gwenn Haworth and Love Ablan. Their work is brilliant and moving and powerful, even while they struggle with similar financial and artistic constraints that I have to contend with.  They inspire me to make better and better work, to be able to communicate my experiences and reflect my ideas more clearly and with emotional honesty.

GenToGen is about helping to Support the Arts and the Artists who create them while building a dynamic Jewish community that is trans-denominational, pluralistic and trans-disciplinary. Are you Jewish and if so, how do you approach your Jewishness (are you secular, traditional, cultural, young leadership, conservative)?
            I am somewhere in-between secular and religious.  I grew up as a Conservative Jew and still enjoy the prayers and rituals of my tradition, however I currently identify more strongly with secular Jewish culture.

How does your Jewish background influence your art?
             My Jewish background influences my art in that I am mostly pursuing artistic mediums with a long Jewish history.  Screenwriting and filmmaking have been heavily Jewish endeavors for a long time now, so that in and of itself seems tied to my Jewish background.  Also, my work has a strong emphasis on reflecting community and even creating community, and I hold community as a strong value because of my Jewish upbringing.

Queerer Than Thou Title Shot
 

I've worked with you on many projects, but I'm curious about how important it is to you to create Art that provokes or pushes the envelope?
              I think it is always important that my Art impact the audience, that someone who watches my films or hears my songs has some sort of an emotional reaction to my work.  So I think it is always crucial that my art provoke a feeling or reaction in the audience.  I do this through mixing humor with pain, sarcasm with earnestness, and clever wordplay with intimate and honest confessionals.

Where do you currently live?
           I live in Los Angeles CA.

Kalil Cohen


Going from the local to the global, what are your biggest concerns for the world and how does Art help repair those concerns?
            My biggest concern is that we will have so destroyed the planet and disintegrated meaningful human interactions that there will be nothing left for our grandchildren to enjoy.  Art helps me replenish when I am feeling defeated by the myriad problems currently facing our society and the world at large.

What age group are you in? The Golden Age (45+), the In-Between Gen (33-45), Next Gen (21-32), Youth
           Next Gen.
 
GenToGen is all about connecting multiple generations… how does your Art connect the different age groups?
            Younger people tend to connect more easily with the hip hop, however the political content is enjoyed by people of all ages, and frequently people who do not generally like the genre will comment on how much they enjoyed my show despite not normally liking hip hop.  The films I have made reach people of different ages because they screen in diverse locations from college campuses and college classes to film festivals and workshops.

Why do you feel it is important to stay connected to all generations?
           The only hope that we can possibly have for the future involves a world in which we learn from our elders, contribute to the world ourselves, and pass on what we know to those younger than us.  That is not to say that knowledge passes in only one direction.  It is important for older people to learn from younger people too, and certainly adults have many things to learn from children.  It is this interaction between generations that will help us find a path toward a sustainable future.

What's your legacy, Kalil?
              My legacy is bringing people together to create alternatives to the unhealthy structures of society.  One of the main ways that I do this at the moment is through organizing the TG Film Fest: The Los Angeles Transgender Film Festival.  Through this event audience members get to meet like-minded people, see themselves reflected in the media, and support the artists whose work they value.
 
...And where do you see yourself in 5 years as a filmmaker?
              In five years I plan on having a script completed for a feature film, and hope to be putting together the funding the make that film.

You will make it happen, I'm certain. On that same note, what are some of your BIGGEST, JUICIEST GOALS and how will your form of Art help you get there?
         Making a feature film is a huge goal for me and one that will take many years and the help of many collaborators.  The short films that I am working on now (including my current music video "So Pomo" for one of my hip hop songs) will help me get there by developing the skills and knowledge I need in order to reach this large goal.

From what I've seen you grow into in just a short amount of time of 6 years since I've known you, the largest goal you could ever imagine is already achieved by you taking action. In fact, it's smaller than you think. The world is your canvas, Kalil!

Kalil Cohen is a filmmaker and writer, and the founding director of TG Film Fest: Los Angeles Transgender Film Festival, bringing world-class transgender films to audiences in southern California.  His award-winning short film “Queerer Than Thou” (2008) has screened at LGBT film festivals around the world, including in London, New York, San Francisco, Los Angeles, Brussels, Jakarta, and Mumbai. His documentaries on gender have screened at academic conferences throughout the US and have been included in college curricula.  He has presented on using media for social justice advocacy at the Allied Media Conference and at Abriendo Brecha, an activist scholarship conference at University of Texas at Austin.


WEB:    www.metahumanmusic.com www.tgfilmfest.com

Youtube - ReelBoiProductions | FAN PAGE: http://on.fb.me/e8tnGZ

Kalil Cohen/Metahuman

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

GenToGen's Mission:  Utilizing media-rich + enterprising online social media interaction systems alongside active + traditional community-based engagement, GenToGen - a multi-channel, hybrid organization - aims to alleviate societal ailing on a micro (individual) and macro (community-wide) level via the fostering, nurturing and supporting of a sustainable Dynamic Hub for the Arts for Next Gen Jewish Artists and their Multi-Generational, Trans-Denominational + Trans-Disciplined peers.

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GenToGenPodcast - Episode 1 - Laurel Johnson Photography (Read full Interview at http://gentogen.podomatic.com)
April 03, 2011 08:23 PM PDT

Minicast Photos - Global Footprint; Kiddish Cup; LA Downtown; Merced River; Laurel Johnson (Photographer); Laurel Johnson (Photographer); Tallit.

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"If I could sit down and have tea with anyone, it would probably be James Nachtwey. He is one of my photographic heroes & has put his life on the line to capture the images he has. His spirit and devotion to making a difference in the world are a huge inspiration to me."

Laurel Johnson, GenToGen Podcast Interview, April 2011

http://gentogen.podomatic.com

Read the Interview Now

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When going through the process of deciding the first Artist to feature on this first ever Los Angeles GenToGen podcast, it became clear right away the person whom fit the GenToGen model: someone who was using Art to heal themselves while healing others via their medium of Art, and in many ways, unintentionally. I picked this person because they create the most beautifully crafted Art simply by radiating beautiful soul vibrations and viewing life through a lens of Art, even through the gritty images that are beautiful in that "I-have-really-lived" sort of way.
Just when I was about to approach Laurel Johnson, she had just posted another great series of photography on her Facebook page.  Synchronicity!
With the depth and heart and passion Ms. Johnson delivers in every photo, it was the "duh" moment I needed to 100% commit to do my part to make sure more people notice her Artistry.
I am honored that Laurel agreed to be our first feature.  She has taken some awesome candid photos of me during DJ sets so I already knew the caliber of her works… but then when you check out the other stuff she's doing and has done for Weddings & Engagements, in LA's Santee Alley, and especially her Fashion Photos, among other fantastic projects, you too can see why I am honored
So without further ado, read about Laurel in twenty questions and make sure you 'like' her to stay up to date (I'm sure she'd appreciate emails, too).  She's creating such heat, and now you're on the wave with her.  Enjoy!

WEB:    www.laureljohnsonphotography.com | FAN PAGE: http://ow.ly/4shWy |

EMAIL: laureljohnsonphotography@yahoo.com  | TEL:     (310) 625-0420

To Arts,

Tera "Nova Jade* Greene
Creative Director + Visionary, GenToGen

Are you or do you know of any Los-Angeles Based Next Gen (21-33) Jewish Artists looking for more exposure and want to be a part of a dynamic Artist community? Well, GenToGen wants your tunes, art, poetry, et al! Please submit to: GenToGenLA@Gmail.com with the subject 'Artist Submission'. Submissions will be received on a rolling bases.  All submissions welcome regardless of generation, discipline or denomination.

*

Merced River

Six dynamic adjectives about Laurel Johnson:
       "Energetic, positive, passionate, motivated, reflective and determined!"

Laurel's favorite color:
      "…probably red. But I like black a lot too."

What form of Art do you do?
           Currently, my main artistic medium is photography, although I also love to draw and paint. I have always been drawn towards art, drawing, making pictures, and finding ways to interpret the world around me. Growing up, my parents were artists, my dad a fine woodworker, and my mother a painter. As a little girl I can remember the way that my dad’s workshop smelled, the sawdust on the floor, and the loud sounds of the tools whirling above my head. I have always felt the need to create, to imagine, and to lose myself in the fantasies I create in my head. I spent a lot of years searching, trying to find a way to tell my story, and looking for the best possible way to express myself creatively.  I have found what I was looking for in photography.
 
So, is this a profession or a hobby?
         What started out as a hobby is now blossoming into my full time profession. I opened my own photography business last year and work doing freelance jobs, shooting nature, portraits, fashion, weddings and food. Prior to going back to school, I spent a couple years debating whether or not being a photographer was what I wanted to do with my life professionally, and now there is no doubt in my mind. I feel truly blessed and grateful that I get to do what I love for a living. It rarely feels like work!
 
When did you start doing your Art?
       In high school I inherited [my] first camera, a clunky, beautiful, old 35 mm Nikon. I fell in love photography, the weekend road-trips, hand processing my film in cold silver canisters, the smell of the chemistry in the darkroom, and watching as my images slowly, almost magically appeared on the paper.  It was not until years later that I made the transition to my first digital camera, at first feeling like it lacked the soul I had grown to love with film. But in the end, it is about the images I create, and the soul that I breathe into them.

Describe a moment in time where Art truly healed you.
            There was a project that I completed recently which was a personal documentary piece in which I examined a period of my life that was incredibly difficult. Although I had processed my thoughts and feelings about that period of time intellectually and emotionally, until this project, I had never worked investigated it artistically. The creative process was immensely healing for me and touched my soul in a way that only art can.

What other forms of Art inspire you?
           All art inspires me! I am energized by painting, music, architecture, woodworking, film, printmaking, and sculpture, to name a few!  I try to look at the world with my eyes wide open, and pull inspiration from anything I can.

Who are your influences?
            My influences are painters, artists, and photographers. I love such a wide variety of artists. A short list would include: Edward Hopper, Salvador Dali, Paul Klee, Gregory Crewdson, Andy Warhol, Richard Avedon, Henri Cartier-Bresson, David Lachapelle, Tim Walker, Irving Penn, Nick Knight, Pornchai Mittongtare, and James Nachtwey. Right now I have the pleasure of working with Paul Jasmin who is one of my favorite fashion photographers, and who has been a huge inspiration to me as well.

GenToGen is about helping to Support the Arts and the Artists who create them while building a dynamic Jewish community that is trans-denominational, pluralistic and trans-disciplinary. Are you Jewish and if so, how do you approach your Jewishness (are you secular, traditional, cultural, young leadership, conservative)?
            Technically, I am a reformed Jew, but still like to think of myself as fairly traditional. I go to temple as often as I can, and observe all the holidays. I have sung in the choir at my temple, Beit T’Shuvah, and volunteer as a staff photographer for their magazine.

How does your Jewish background influence your art?
             My Jewish background influences me as a person more than it does my art at the moment, although I have been trying to embrace my “Jewishness” in my art more recently. I curated a photography exhibit last month at Sinai Temple at the Ashkenafard Music festival. I chose to display a series of portraits of some of my “edgy” Jewish friends, and it was a great experience to collaborate with so many talented Jewish artists. Having a deeper understanding of myself allows me to explore fragments of life in more abstract ways, and allows me the opportunity to interact with people I might otherwise not engage with.

Kiddush Cup
 

You mentioned doing an "edgy" project recently at the Ashkenafard Music Festival.  How important is it to you to create Art that provokes or pushes the envelope?
              There are times when I want my art to make an impact or evoke a particular emotion, and there are times when I simply want to capture a beautiful image. I rarely create images with the sole intention of provoking my viewers. I use my camera to tell stories, the stories that I have within myself, and the stories I see in the world around me.  I use photography as a means of self-expression, as a way to identify with hidden qualities within myself, to better understand my reality, and to reveal my interpretation of the world around me. My choice of subject comes from a place of intuition and is fed by a powerful desire to become a part the stories that unfold around me. I am intrigued by the unknown. I look for the light within the shadows, the uncommon in the common, and beauty in unexpected places.  Whether in nature or in an urban environment, I am fascinated with color, geometry, patterns, form, texture and the interplay between these elements. I am fascinated and inspired by the unique beauty found in nature as well as the beauty found in the dark graffiti covered interiors of abandoned buildings. Whatever the locale, my hope is that my images will stir up unexpected feelings and thoughts in my viewers.

Where do you currently live?
           Right now I am living in Pasadena less than a mile from the Rose Bowl. I love all the old architecture, cool little restaurants, and the galleries and museums that I live so close to.

Global Footprint


Cool, that area is historic for sure.  OK, let's shift gears a bit… Tell me, what are your biggest concerns for the world and how does art help repair those concerns?
            I don’t even know where to begin as far as what my biggest concerns with the world are right now! Between all of the wars, and the horrifying destruction of our environment, art is one of the most useful tools I have and helps me to stay positive. The best possible way to illustrate the present-day ecological disaster we are facing is through images. I believe that art is a powerful tool to bring about change.  Art has the ability to compel people. Art can encourage awareness, provide hope during challenging times, build community, and is a strong platform for social change.

What age group are you in? The Golden Age (45+), the In-Between Gen (33-45), Next Gen (21-32), Youth
           I would be considered Next Gen!
 
GenToGen is all about connecting multiple generations… how does your Art connect the different age groups?
            I think that my art is relevant to any age group. My little cousin has one of my photographs hanging in her room, as do all my Grandparents! My amazing Grandma Sylvia has always had a passion for art and photography, and her home is like a personal gallery of my art, with beautifully framed photos I have taken in nearly every room of her home!

As a fellow Next Gen-er, why do you feel it is important to stay connected to all generations?
           For me it is essential that we stay connected to all generations, they are the bonds to our past and to our future. We have to know where we came from to know where we are going!

What's your legacy?
              My legacy is a work in progress.. I hope that in the end I will have left a positive impact on the world, and that I will have given back more than I have received. I want to make a difference, still trying to figure out the best way to make that happen!
 
OK, so let's maybe not get so deep. [laughs] Where do you see yourself in 5 years as a photographer?
              Five years from now I hope to have a rewarding career, emotionally, financially, and spiritually.  I will be living a healthy, balanced, and fulfilling life. I would love to be able to use my photography to travel to areas I have never been, and experience and document the world through my lens.

Right on!  Just out of curiosity, what are some of your BIGGEST, JUICIEST GOALS and how will your form of Art help you get there?
        
         As of right now, I am working doing portraiture, weddings, and events which help fund my personal projects. My biggest goal in the future is to use my art to make a difference and help to shed light on social issues and environmental issues. My camera is my tool, and I will use my images in whatever way I can to bring beauty into the world and awareness to important issues. Taking pictures is how I express myself, and how I show appreciation for the world around me. My work reflects who I am, what I love, and what I find to be beautiful.

Thank you for sharing your story, Laurel.  We're all ears and eyes.

WEB:    www.laureljohnsonphotography.com | FAN PAGE: http://ow.ly/4shWy

Laurel Johnson (Photographer)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

GenToGen's Mission:  Utilizing media-rich + enterprising online social media interaction systems alongside active + traditional community-based engagement, GenToGen - a multi-channel, hybrid organization - aims to alleviate societal ailing on a micro (individual) and macro (community-wide) level via the fostering, nurturing and supporting of a sustainable Dynamic Hub for the Arts for Next Gen Jewish Artists and their Multi-Generational, Trans-Denominational + Trans-Disciplined peers.

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